MRNSW volunteers recognised for 150 years’ service on the water

10 Years Service Medal
Twelve Marine Rescue NSW volunteers who have given a total of 150 years’ dedicated service to the NSW boating community were recognised in a ceremony at Sussex Inlet this afternoon.

Marine Rescue NSW Commissioner Stacey Tannos presented Long Service Medals to the members of Marine Rescue Sussex Inlet to acknowledge their long and diligent service.

'Our volunteers are the great strength of Marine Rescue NSW. They are committed to saving lives on the water and give their time unstintingly to provide a vital emergency service in coastal communities such as Sussex Inlet and its South Coast neighbours,' he said.

'To have 12 members in one unit contributing a combined 150 years of service to Marine Rescue NSW and formerly the Royal Volunteer Coastal Patrol demonstrates the commitment that is consistently shown by our volunteers.

'Since I joined Marine Rescue NSW 10 weeks ago, I have been out talking to our members to find out what they need, what are the issues of importance to them and how we can support them in their work to assist and protect the boating community.

'I want to acknowledge each of them for their hard work and dedication to this organisation and the boating public. It is a special honour for me to be able to present the Sussex Inlet members with these medals as a tangible acknowledgement of our gratitude.'

The 12 volunteers from Sussex Inlet who received medals are:

John Nicholas 30 years
Frank Flanagan 20 years
Barry Childs 20 years
Ronald Ford 10 years
Thomas Dunlop 10 years
Raymond Barrie 10 years
Philip Oliver 10 years
Ronald Streeter 10 years
Thomas Clay 10 years
Neil Etherington 10 years
Ellen Dodd 5 years
Thomas Dodd 5 years

Marine Rescue NSW has more than 3,200 members who operate 50 Marine Rescue units including 42 Radio units along the NSW coastline.

In addition to Search and Rescue, Marine Rescue NSW volunteers also provide continuous radio communication from the Queensland to Victorian borders and a range of boating safety education courses.

They also give their time to train and to energetically raise funds in their local communities.

Commissioner Tannos acknowledged the vital support of the NSW Government and the boating community for Marine Rescue’s emergency, radio and training services.

'The generous financial support MRNSW receives from the State Government and members of the boating community as a contribution from their boat licences and registrations has enabled us to embark on an ambitious program to modernise our rescue fleet,' he said.

'Our number one priority is safety on the water for both our volunteers and the boating community and we are working to provide our volunteers with up-to-date, safe and reliable equipment for their valuable work.

'This Government and boating community funding means we can depend on about 50 per cent of the budget we need to provide a world-class marine search and rescue, radio network and education service for safer boating.

'Even with this funding support, as a community-based organisation, we still need to rely on our volunteers’ energetic fundraising to contribute to the $14 million we need to provide our baoting safety services.'

Commissioner Tannos reminded local boaters to always log on and log off with Marine Rescue Sussex Inlet whenever they are on the water.

To find all Marine Rescue NSW bases, visit Marine Rescue NSW website.