Earthrace ahead of Round World Record

Earthrace crosses the Atlantic
As darkness falls in the Caribbean, the 78 foot biodiesel fuelled trimaran Earthrace skippered by Pete Bethune is just 360 miles short of San Juan the capital of Puerto Rico on the second 2315 nautical mile leg of their 2008 record attempt.

At 12:35 GMT, seven days into their Round the World circumnavigation speed attempt, Earthrace had powered 3356 nautical miles, averaged 479.5 miles per day, just on 20 knots per hour.

They set out from the Vulkan Shipyard at the port of Sagunto, Spain, Sunday, April 27, aiming to set a new world record for a powerboat circling the globe running 100 percent on sustainable fuels.

A week into the record attempt Earthrace is around 18 hours from her second stopover, pushing along at more than 20 knots. Their Atlantic crossing has been relatively smooth they had a fuel hatch come loose, producing a minor fuel spill; better biodiesel, than petroleum diesel.

Then 36 hours ago they had a period of six metres waves on the nose, but the wave piercer punched into the heavy waves at speeds of 14-15 knots and is now speeding towards the next refuelling stop with 15-17 knot trade winds following them from the north east and waves of 1.5 to 2 metres.

Earthrace is now 850 nautical miles ahead of the record time set in 1998 by the United Kingdom boat Cables & Wireless Adventurer. The present record is 74 days, 23 hours, and 53 minutes.

The full record route is as follows:
Sagunto (Spain) – Horta (Azores) – San Juan (Puerto Rico) – Colon (Panama Canal, Panama), – Manzanillo (Mexico) – San Diego (USA) – Maalaea Harbor, Maui (Hawaii) – Majuro (Marshall Islands) – Koror (Palau) – Singapore – Kochi/Cochin (India) – Salalah (Oman) – Port Said (Suez Canal, Egypt) – Sagunto (Spain)

Listen to the latest sat phone report from Earthrace below.